Monthly ArchiveJuly 2017

Key Priorities for Fire Station Project Includes Visual Appeal, Resistance to Algae and Wind

Key Priorities for Fire Station Project Includes Visual Appeal, Resistance to Algae and Wind

When the fire station decided to replace its aging steep-slope system, the goals included finding a system that would look good, stand up to high winds and resist algae growth.

When the fire station decided to replace its aging steep-slope system, the goals included finding a system that would look good, stand up to high winds and resist algae growth.

The firemen and firewomen of the Burlington Fire Department, located in Burlington, Wash., reportedly respond to about 1,800 service calls a year. The members of the department are on call 24/7, handling a variety of emergencies, both big and small.

Whether it is fighting a fire, performing a search and rescue, or something as simple as retrieving a driver’s keys from the car, the city’s bravest are too busy to have roof issues make their days more difficult. When the fire station began to experience leaks that required countless repairs and patchwork solutions, the City of Burlington knew it was time to replace the entire roofing system and ensure that the firefighters were safe from the elements.

Over the last few years, leaks began to appear more frequently in the fire station’s roof, with the worst leaks occurring in the paramedic’s quarters and in the firehouse’s workout room. The water would drip down on the firefighters and ceiling tiles became discolored, creating an unpleasant appearance throughout the firehouse. The intense winds in the area would also cause the shingles of the roof to become loose and fly off.

“The roof was patched several times over the years. We filled the voids as we went,” says Brandon Bond, a lieutenant on the Burlington Fire Department for the last 10 years. “After a while, the patches and replacements weren’t working and the leaks were getting harder to fix. At that point, we knew it was time to replace the whole roof.”

For their new roof, the city wanted a material that was visually appealing and performed against algae and wind. Also, because this was a city project, they wanted to find a contractor who was nearby and a roofing material that was manufactured locally—all of which showed pride in their community. When they considered the criteria, along with the size of the roof—24,000 square feet—the city chose to go with asphalt shingles because they provided a high level of longevity and durability while keeping it affordable.

Asphalt shingles offered a heavyweight, wind-resistant roofing material with a number of color options, making it the optimal choice among the design team. Wind resistance was an important factor because the old roofing system sustained considerable wind damage. The winds in the area can reach 65-70 miles per hour.

Selecting the Right System

Cascade Roofing Company from Burlington was hired to install the new roof on the fire station. The company has been in business for nearly 30 years and works on both commercial and residential roofing projects. The owner of Cascade, Rick Steiner, explains that asphalt shingles were used on the fire station for a number of reasons.

“Shingles were used because of the different pitch heights of the roof, their affordability and their great look,” Steiner says. “The algae-resistance was also a must. Algae grows like weeds in Washington, due to the moisture in the air and fluctuating temperatures.”

Algae flourishes in humid climates and its spores can be carried by the wind. The temperate but rainy weather found in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. produces an environment for algae to thrive in. While algae is not known to cause damage to roofs, the dark streaks are unsightly.

“Burlington is very wet, whether it’s raining or if we’re dealing with the humidity,” says Lauren Wilkins, a firefighter at the Burlington Fire Department since 2012. “We wanted the new roof to provide some resistance to algae so that it looked good as compared to the other surrounding roofs in the area.”

Cascade used shingle manufacturer PABCO Roofing Products, located in nearby Tacoma, Wash. PABCO’s algae-resistant Paramount Signature Cut Shingle in Oakwood color was selected for the project because it provided exceptional curb appeal. An aggressive modified sealant was used as well as high-wind shingle application—6 nails—to add resistance to wind uplift. PABCO Paramount starter shingles were applied over PABCO Universal Starter to provide a double-layer base. A synthetic underlayment along with an ice and water shield on the leading edges were also used. Shasta HD Ridge was applied to the ridge and hips of the roof to complement the roofline.

The roof system covers 24,000 square feet. An aggressive modified sealant and a high-wind shingle application using six nails add resistance to wind uplift.

The roof system covers 24,000 square feet. An aggressive modified sealant and a high-wind shingle application using six nails add resistance to wind uplift.

Keeping it Local

The City of Burlington was thrilled to choose local companies for the project. The manufacturer, contractor and even the supplier were all located nearby. This provided Cascade an avenue for necessary materials to be delivered quickly, allowing them to stay under budget and ahead of schedule. The project took about two weeks and 230 squares of shingles to complete, which is equivalent to the number of shingles necessary for the company to roof six or seven regular-sized homes.

“It’s easily the biggest shingle job I’ve ever done,” Steiner says. “But the design of the building along with the high-profile look of the shingles made the project look incredible. The city has a roof that’s going to last a very long time.”

Steiner also points out how smooth operations were due to the local theme of the project. “Everything was on-time. The supplier was right across the street and very easy to work with,” Steiner notes. “Even the weather cooperated – it made a potentially difficult project that much easier.”

The firefighters felt the same way. “We thought the hardest thing about the renovation would be continuing our daily operations, but we didn’t run into any problems,” Wilkins says. “They were very friendly and easy to coordinate with when moving equipment. There were no horror stories here.”

Since the renovation was completed, the firefighters are very happy with the new roof. The firemen and firewomen of the Burlington Fire Department can now focus on keeping the residents of Burlington safe.

The unique installation of the roof also earned Cascade Roofing and the fire station project the 2017 Bronze Award in the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study (QARC) Awards Program. Each year, ARMA seeks out the most beautiful, affordable and reliable asphalt roofing systems in North America.

Award-winning projects are selected based on innovation, performance and beauty, and recognize projects that lead the way in areas like weather protection, green roofing or unique utilization of asphalt shingles in a roofing system. ARMA is currently accepting submissions for both low- and steep-slope roofing project installations completed in 2017 for its 2018 awards program. Roofing contractors can submit multiple projects through Dec. 31, and there is no fee to enter.

For more information about asphalt roofing systems, the QARC awards program and more, visit the website.

PHOTOS: JAROD TROW PHOTOGRAPHY

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Published at Mon, 24 Jul 2017 19:00:23 +0000

Overcome Procrastination in Three Easy Steps

Overcome Procrastination in Three Easy Steps

You are a dedicated business owner. I know this because you are taking time to increase your professional development by reading this magazine and this article.

Because you are a business owner who is dedicated to success, it would make sense that you don’t procrastinate—right? You can quickly and easily accomplish all the important tasks and projects that help move your business forward. Your taxes are completed ahead of time. You are never up late at night looking for data to complete an estimate. You never have to redo tasks because you made errors as you were trying to finish by the deadline.

Before you stop reading in frustration, know that according to Tim Pychyl, author of Solving the Procrastination Puzzle, everyone procrastinates. So, you are not alone!

The question really becomes, how do you overcome your procrastination? There isn’t a “one size fits all” solution to the procrastination challenge. However, there is a process you can follow to find your solution.
Use the acronym A.W.E.
A – Awareness. What are some of the tasks you procrastinate on most often?
W – Work. What are some strategies to help put yourself in motion?
E – Evaluation. What worked and how do you do more of it?

The Three-Step Process

Let’s start with awareness. What are some of the tasks that typically cause you to procrastinate? Do you avoid invoicing clients? Or posting on social media? Or sending estimates? Or evaluating employees? Or doing customer service follow-up calls? Or meeting with your accountant? Or creating a marketing plan? Or creating a business plan?

Start to really think about the tasks you put off. Now that you have a good idea about what those tasks are, it’s time to create a strategy to overcome procrastination. This is the work phase.

According to Pychyl, we procrastinate when we find a task unattractive. The more unattractive, the more we procrastinate. Unattractive tasks have one or more of the following traits. They are:

  • Boring
  • Frustrating
  • Difficult
  • Unstructured or ambiguous
  • Lacking in personal meaning
  • Lacking in intrinsic rewards (not fun!)
  • Which trait corresponds to your task? Do you procrastinate when it comes to invoicing clients because you find paperwork boring and frustrating? Do you put off evaluating employees because you find conflict (or perceived conflict) difficult? Have you decided that you’ll do a marketing plan next year (or the year after that) because the whole idea is ambiguous and you don’t even know where to start?

    Once you can identify the trait that’s holding you back, you can create a strategy to help move yourself into action. If a task is boring, make it fun. (OK, maybe paperwork won’t ever be fun, but it can be less boring.) Play music loud, challenge yourself to finish the task in under 20 minutes, and reward yourself when it is done.

    If creating a marketing plan seems ambiguous, add some structure to it. Talk it out with some colleagues. Consult with a marketing professional. Do some reading on marketing plans. Decide what your goals are for the plan. Figure out just one step. Once you’ve identified even one step, it becomes much easier to move into action.

    Finally, evaluation. When you can do more of what works and less of what doesn’t, life becomes much easier. Yet you seldom take the time to slow down long enough to think through what is working! Take 10 minutes to check back at the end of the week. Which strategies worked? Where are you procrastinating less? Where do you still need to problem solve?

    By following the steps spelled out in A.W.E., you will be able to reduce the amount of time you procrastinate and increase your capacity to accomplish more in less time. Which leaves you with a lot more time to do all those things you love to do!

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    Published at Mon, 24 Jul 2017 20:00:25 +0000

    Desperate times, desperate measures?

    Desperate times, desperate measures?

    Column written by Ambika Puniani Bailey, NRCA’s vice president of communications and production as it appears in Professional Roofing magazine’s July issue.

    Construction worker climbing ladderThe construction industry, indeed the entire U.S., is struggling to fill jobs as the unemployment rate dipped to 4.4 percent in April—the lowest it’s been since the Great Recession. (The federal government considers full U.S. employment to be 4.7 percent.)

    Yes, employing immigrant labor is one option though hiring foreign workers places multiple paperwork burdens on employers plus other hurdles to clear, such as language barriers. Instead, according to the Center for Economic and Policy Research, more employers are actively recruiting and hiring those with criminal records.

    In fact, according to Bloomberg BNA, a medium security prison in Sheridan, Ill., has been training inmates in carpentry and plumbing skills. And the Association of Chamber of Commerce Executives and the Council of State Governments Justice Center jointly agreed to help chamber members hire ex-offenders.

    The numbers are astounding. According to the Center for Economic and Policy Research, there are between 14 million and 15.8 million working-age people with felony convictions and 70 million with an arrest or conviction record. And Evanston, Ill.-based Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management reports 650,000 prisoners are set free annually in the U.S.

    When asked about hiring those with criminal records, National Association of Home Builders CEO Gerald Howard told Bloomberg BNA: “We have a huge labor shortage. This has become a focus out of necessity.”Felons

    As an added perk, employers that hire and retain ex-felons are offered a federal Work Opportunity Tax Credit. (The same tax credit applies to those who hire and retain veterans.) And research conducted by Northwestern University showed ex-offenders are no more likely to be fired than non-offenders after being hired. In addition, the research showed ex-offenders were much less likely to quit a job than non-offenders.

    With a historically tight job market, you might need to get creative with your hiring policies. And as you explore your hiring options, keep in mind Equal Employment Opportunity guidelines and protections apply when hiring ex-offenders just as they would with any other job candidate.

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    Published at Mon, 24 Jul 2017 20:22:11 +0000

    ASTM International Launches New Online Learning Management System

    ASTM International Launches New Online Learning Management System

    ASTM International announced that it is launching a new learning management system (LMS) designed to enhance user experience and functionality. Existing customers will begin seeing a seamless transition to the new platform. The migration will be completed by Aug. 31.
     
    According to ASTM International, since 2012, the number of online users has grown from 500 to over 4,000. Usage increased by over 174 percent last year alone, prompting the need for a more robust platform.
     
    The new LMS features an expanded search tool, 24/7 access to ASTM International training content, enhanced reporting capabilities and customized curriculums. Training modules are accessible from any device.

    From the new homepage, learners will be able to find new training modules, access completed training, browse catalogs, and print certificates. In addition, courses can be downloaded and completed offline.

    Accirdng to the organization, there will be continued updates to the LMS, including the addition of a “video wall,” where learners will have easier access to training videos.

    For more information, visit the website or contact the learning management team via email at LMS_Support@astm.org

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    Published at Fri, 21 Jul 2017 18:41:40 +0000

    Roofinox Displays Stainless Steel Roofing Products at ATAS Product Expo

    Roofinox Displays Stainless Steel Roofing Products at ATAS Product Expo

    Roofinox America recently joined with ATAS International to educate more than 125 contractors, architects, engineers, distributors and building owners about the latest advances in building materials at the ATAS Product & Education Expo. Held at the ATAS headquarters in Allentown, Pa., the event included the display of Roofinox’s full line of stainless steel roofing products designed to offer long-term sustainability and corrosion resistance for virtually all forms of roofing applications. 

    “ATAS International was pleased to once again host our annual product expo,” stated Lee Ann M. Slattery, sales support manager for ATAS International.  “In addition to the vendor displays and plant tours, we also offered three AIA continuing education seminars throughout the day.  These seminars were highlighted by numerous topics related to metal roofing, rain screen systems, and sustainable building envelopes applications. It is our goal to increase awareness and knowledge throughout the AEC community for the proper and growing use of metal building components.”

    “We were happy to join ATAS in this educational forum,” said Dave Rowe, vice president at Roofinox America. “Architects and engineers are continually searching for the latest ways to enhance the longevity and sustainability of their design projects. Stainless steel is ideal for applications ranging from rural, urban and light industrial sites to locations based in extreme coastal environments.”

    The Roofinox product line consists of Roofinox Classic brush-rolled stainless steel, Roofinox Pearl bead-blasted stainless steel, Roofinox Plus ribbed stainless steel, Roofinox Chroma mirror-rolled stainless steel and Roofinox Tin-plated (Terne), the only tin-plated stainless steel product specifically developed and manufactured for roll forming and fabricating, according to the manufacturer. Designed to offer long-term sustainability and corrosion-resistance for wall-cladding, flashing, rainware, interior design and virtually all forms of roofing applications, each Roofinox product is also designed to be very easy to seam, while offering superior aesthetics and reducing machine and tool wear.

    ATAS International manufactures metal roofing, metal wall cladding, metal ceiling panels and metal accessories, produces systems for commercial and residential buildings. The ATAS metal roofing and metal wall product line offers more than 20 profiles available in stainless steel, aluminum, steel, zinc and copper.

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    Published at Fri, 21 Jul 2017 19:00:58 +0000

    The Beer That Saved My Life

    The Beer That Saved My Life

    Did I ever tell you about the beer that saved my life?

    One day, the freezer motor in my refrigerator started to make a horrendous shrieking sound. I opened the freezer door, grabbed a pound of frozen ground round, and threw it at the back wall of the freezer. The noise stopped. Problem solved.

    Unfortunately, the shrieking episodes continued and became more and more frequent. When I began dating Patti, the lovely woman who later became my wife, she was not impressed. “What are you going to do about that?” she said, hooking a thumb at my musical freezer. “What do you mean?” I replied. “I’m just never going to thaw that ground round.”

    I knew that wasn’t a good long-term answer, but a new refrigerator was just not in my budget. However, Patti did some research and found out that a new freezer motor was relatively inexpensive and easy to install.

    After purchasing the motor, I pulled out the refrigerator to install it. The galley kitchen was tight, so I had to reach around the refrigerator blindly to unplug it. I removed the back panel of the freezer and took out the old motor without too much difficulty. It was thirsty work, and remembered I had some beer in the refrigerator that would still be cold. I opened the door to pull one out, and realized with alarm that the refrigerator light was on. The unit was still plugged in!

    Suddenly I wasn’t very thirsty any more. I realized that I had unplugged the microwave instead of the refrigerator. I was lucky not to have been shocked. It probably wouldn’t have been fatal, but I guess it possibly might have been, and it makes a better story to tell it that way. In any event, after unplugging the unit, I was able to complete the repair. We thawed the ground round and cooked up some hamburgers that night to celebrate.

    What does this have to do with roofing? Unfortunately, too much. Many building owners think of their roofs much like I thought of my refrigerator. It is the job of roofing professionals to educate them so they can avoid these common mistakes:

  • Out of sight, out of mind:Roofs are often overlooked by building owners unless a problem crops up. But that’s often too late. Routine maintenance can be the key to spotting minor problems before they become major ones. It can also be a necessary component of the warranty.
  • Using stopgap measures: If a problem does crop up, owners might try to repair it themselves and cause more harm than good. As the roof becomes a platform for not only HVAC equipment but solar arrays, cell towers and satellite dishes, damage to the roof becomes more and more likely.
  • Not consulting a professional: Roofs face potential damage from extreme weather, debris, foot traffic, and a host of other problems. To get the most out of their investment, building owners need expert advice. Planning ahead can make budgeting a future repair or roof replacement much easier.
  • If you are a roofing professional with clients who might not be getting the most out of their roofing assets, stop by and talk to them about the benefits of a roof inspection or a maintenance program. Invite them out for a beer to talk it over. Of course, drinking alcoholic beverages on the job is never advisable under any circumstances, but a beer after work never hurt anyone. Who knows, it just might save someone’s life.

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    Published at Fri, 21 Jul 2017 16:05:41 +0000

    Alliance Awards $55,000 in Scholarships Through Melvin Kruger Endowed Scholarship Program 

    Alliance Awards $55,000 in Scholarships Through Melvin Kruger Endowed Scholarship Program 

    The Roofing Industry Alliance for Progress has announced the recipients of its 2017 Melvin Kruger Endowed Scholarships, which include five new recipients and the renewal of six scholarships for the 2017-18 academic year.

    The Alliance awarded two new general scholarships to Nicolas Calvert, son of Edward Calvert, senior engineer, Kalkreuth Roofing and Sheet Metal Inc., Wheeling, W.Va., and Sophia McGuire, daughter of Mark McGuire, project manager, AAA Roofing Co., Indianapolis.

    In addition, a new Firestone Scholarship has been awarded to Alyssa Merna, sales coordinator, Bloom Roofing System Inc., Brighton, Mich.

    A new Beacon Roofing Supply Scholarship has also been awarded to Salvador Flores Garcia, son of Jose Flores Estrada, roofer, Alcal Arcade Contracting, Fremont, Calif.

    A new OMG Roofing Products Inc. Scholarship has been awarded to Lillian McKenzie, daughter of Christopher McKenzie, salesman, Watts & Associates Roofing, Columbia, S.C.

    The Alliance also renewed six Melvin Kruger Endowed Scholarships, including three general scholarships to Jonah Manson, Solon, Iowa, attending Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa; Dannelly McKenzie, Columbia, S.C., attending Clemson University, Clemson, S.C.; and Drury Poston, Thomson, Ga., attending Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, Ga.

    In addition, a Firestone Scholarship was renewed for Jaclyn Harris, Mooresville, Ind., attending Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind.

    A Dan Cohen Scholarship was renewed for Christian Cole, attending Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, Ga.

    A Fred Good Scholarship also was renewed for Ivy Rivas, Tujunga, Calif., attending University of California Davis, Davis, Calif.

    Each recipient will receive a $5,000 award. Awards are renewable for up to three years of undergraduate study or until a bachelor’s degree is earned provided recipients renew annually and maintain a 3.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale (or the equivalent).

    A total of $55,000 in scholarships was awarded for the 2017-18 school year—$30,000 for renewals and $25,000 for new recipients. To date, 122 students have received $735,000 in scholarship awards.

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    Published at Thu, 20 Jul 2017 14:00:20 +0000

    Vapor-Permeable, Liquid-Applied Technology Provides Continuous Air Barrier

    Vapor-Permeable, Liquid-Applied Technology Provides Continuous Air Barrier

    Soprema introduces SOPRASEAL LM 204 VPSoprema introduces SOPRASEAL LM 204 VP—a one-component, 98 percent solids content, low-odor, vapor-permeable, liquid-applied polyether air barrier product. According to the manufacturer, this new, hybrid STPE technology provides excellent air infiltration and moisture protection while also offering ease of use in low- and high-temperature applications, superior elastomeric performance and tie-in compatibility.

    A fully adhered, monolithic membrane option, SOPRASEAL LM 204 VP offers a continuous air barrier that works well even in applications where conformity to complex geometries is a must. It is ultra-low-VOC and moisture curable in low relative humidity and low-temperature applications, while exhibiting excellent freeze-thaw characteristics. It does not shrink and requires less wet film to achieve dry film thickness, according to the company.

    The product can be applied in temperatures down to 25 degrees Fahrenheit without the use of additional additives. It is also available in an accessory product, SOPRASEAL® Liquid Flashing—a high-quality, 100 percent solid, low-odor, STPE membrane designed to provide air and water protection to critical rough openings while sealing joints and creating a seamless transition to air barrier membranes.

    “We are pleased to offer customers even more choices when waterproofing wall systems with the latest expansion of our SOPRASEAL liquid membrane product line,” says Sara Jonas, Marketing Manager, Soprema. “We want to make it as easy as possible for contractors to keep structures energy efficient and comfortable year-round, and with SOPRASEAL LM 204 VP air barrier technology, they now have a strong option for moisture protection behind wall claddings ranging from brick to siding to metal panels, EIFS and stucco.”

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    Published at Mon, 17 Jul 2017 16:33:32 +0000

    Alliance Awards $55,000 Through 2017 Melvin Kruger Endowed Scholarship Program

    Alliance Awards $55,000 Through 2017 Melvin Kruger Endowed Scholarship Program

    The Alliance has announced the recipients of its 2017 Melvin Kruger Endowed Scholarships, which include six new recipients and the renewal of five scholarships for the 2017-18 academic year.

    The Alliance awarded two new general scholarships to Nicolas Calvert, son of Edward Calvert, senior engineer, Kalkreuth Roofing and Sheet Metal Inc., Wheeling, W.Va., and Sophia McGuire, daughter of Mark McGuire, project manager, AAA Roofing Co., Indianapolis.

    In addition, a new Firestone Scholarship has been awarded to Alyssa Merna, sales coordinator, Bloom Roofing System Inc., Brighton, Mich.

    A new Beacon Roofing Supply Scholarship has also been awarded to Salvador Flores Garcia, son of Jose Flores Estrada, roofer, Alcal Arcade Contracting, Fremont, Calif.

    A new OMG Roofing Products Inc. Scholarship has been awarded to Lillian McKenzie, daughter of Christopher McKenzie, salesman, Watts & Associates Roofing, Columbia, S.C.

    The Alliance also renewed six Melvin Kruger Endowed Scholarships, including three general scholarships to Jonah Manson, Solon, Iowa, attending Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa; Dannelly McKenzie, Columbia, S.C., attending Clemson University, Clemson, S.C.; andDrury Poston, Thomson, Ga., attending Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, Ga.

    In addition, a Firestone Scholarship was renewed for Jaclyn Harris, Mooresville, Ind., attending Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind.

    A Dan Cohen Scholarship was renewed for Christian Cole, attending Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, Ga.

    A Fred Good Scholarship also was renewed for Ivy Rivas, Tujunga, Calif., attending University of California Davis, Davis, Calif.

    Each recipient will receive a $5,000 award. Awards are renewable for up to three years of undergraduate study or until a bachelor’s degree is earned provided recipients renew annually and maintain a 3.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale (or the equivalent).

    A total of $55,000 in scholarships was awarded for the 2017-18 school year–$30,000 for renewals and $25,000 for new recipients. To date, 122 students have received $735,000 in scholarship awards.

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    Published at Wed, 19 Jul 2017 19:14:26 +0000

    ARMA Completes EPDs for Five Types of Asphalt Roofing

    ARMA Completes EPDs for Five Types of Asphalt Roofing

    The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has completed a multi-year effort to develop Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) for asphalt roofing systems. These five new documents provide information that building and construction professionals can use both to support environmental aspects of roof systems as part of sustainable building projects and to better understand their impact over time. EPDs are now available for asphalt shingle roofing systems, SBS and APP modified bitumen systems, and built-up roofing systems. 

    When architects and specifiers embark on new green building initiatives, they need to validate the environmental aspects of the building materials they use. EPDs are used to provide this information and to support the credibility of environmental claims.  ARMA worked with thinkstep, a sustainability consulting company, and with UL Environment to validate the EPDs.  These comprehensive documents outline the environmental attributes associated with the manufacturing of various asphalt-related roofing materials. 
    ARMA’s development of these five EPDs reflects the continued use and advancement of asphalt roofing materials. In some cases, these documents are needed to fulfill requirements for green building rating systems and initiatives such as Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), Green Globes, and the International Green Construction Code (IgCC).

    “As the worldwide building and construction community continues to expand the focus on creating environmentally responsible and resource-efficient building projects, asphalt roofing has a critical role to play,” said Reed Hitchcock, ARMA’s executive vice president. “ARMA is committed to supporting sustainable building initiatives, and we are proud to provide the industry with this important environmental information.”

    “These EPDs will help architects and engineers make sustainable choices in roof design,” said Amy Ferryman, chair of ARMA’s Sustainability Task Force. “Our work to develop these resources helps ensure that the asphalt roofing industry can fully participate in increasingly important green building practices.”
    The five EPDs from ARMA are now publically available and can be accessed on ARMA’s website.

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    Published at Wed, 19 Jul 2017 13:57:42 +0000