Monthly ArchiveSeptember 2017

Former NRCA President, Tecta America Co-Founder Don McNamara has Died

Former NRCA President, Tecta America Co-Founder Don McNamara has Died

The roofing industry is mourning the loss of one its long-time leaders in Don McNamara.

McNamara, 81, was the former owner of Milwaukee-based F.J.A. Christiansen Roofing Co., Inc. (FJAC) for decades and was an influential figure in both regional and national roofing associations.

A graduate of Marquette University Law School, McNamara became a CPA and started his professional career as a tax attorney. He then joined one of his clients and became majority owner of FJAC in 1967. He retired in 1995, but rejoined his family business to lead it toward the consolidation of companies that formed Tecta America Corp. in 2000.

“It is a rare talent to have someone like Don who could manage and control all the type-A people at the beginning of Tecta’s formation,” Said Kim Schwickert, a Tecta co-founder and chairman of Schwickerts. “Without that calm personality I think Tecta would never have gotten off the ground.”

He served as the company’s first CEO and later on its board of directors.

“Don was an imposing man – physically as well as intellectually – but also warm, caring and a lot of fun,” said current Tecta President and CEO Mark Santacrose. “He was the first person I met at Tecta in 2001 and he taught me a ton about the company, the roofing industry and the cast of characters that made up Tecta at the time. He cast a huge shadow and it was my privilege to follow him in my role and my honor to know him.”

McNamara had several roles with the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA), and ultimately served as president from 1986 to 1987. He was a past recipient of the NRCA’s J.A. Piper Award, and the Midwest Roofing Contractors Association’s James Q. McCawley Award, the highest awards bestowed by each organization.

Current NRCA CEO and Wisconsin native Reid Ribble said McNamara was instrumental in getting him involved in the organization decades ago, and was often a mentor in business.

“He was a giant in our industry and will be sorely missed,” Ribble said.

McNamara is survived by his wife Valerie, their 3 children and 9 grandchildren.
Visitation will be at St. Jerome Catholic Church in Oconomowoc, Wis., on Saturday, Sept. 30, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Memorial contributions may be made to Shorehaven, Salvation Army and St. Jerome Catholic Church.

Published at Fri, 22 Sep 2017 19:03:00 +0000

Have a Policy for Side Jobs and Moonlighting

Have a Policy for Side Jobs and Moonlighting

RCS Influencer Michael Hicks says this his company allows side jobs but with conditions.

Our policy is fairly simple and straightforward. Side jobs are permitted with a few qualifiers:

  1. It can’t be any larger than 10 squares. If it’s bigger than 10 squares have the owner contact us and if we get the job there’s a commission for the reference.
  2. If you do a side job, you need to buy the materials from the company
  3. In no way can a side job interfere with your work duties at the company
  4. Work for a competitor and you’re done

Although I recently had several guys doing a weekend side job for a “company,” if you could call a pick-up truck and some hand tools out of the garage a “company,” which had supposedly shut their doors.  We had bid the job, and I’m sure we were quite a bit more expensive.  I guess the promise of one last good job was too much temptation for the retired owner, and the guy waved some big bucks in the face of a guy that came to work for us when the other place closed down.  This individual got several of our other guys to help him, and they were spotted on the roof on a Saturday.

All of them were excellent guys, losing them all for a lapse in judgement would have been tough and they were given the ultimatum to grab their tools and exit the roof immediately as HRI employees, or stay and finish the job as ex-employees.  They all chose to leave, and a thunderstorm passed overhead an hour later.  Not sure what happened, don’t care, but I see the job got finished eventually.

Michael Hicks is owner of Hicks Industrial Roofing. See his full bio here.

Published at Fri, 22 Sep 2017 16:28:04 +0000

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA has been backing down on the number of press releases naming alleged safety violators and recently removed names from its website.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

A recent article by Business Insurance says the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is continuing to shift away from its policy of publicly shaming employers for workplace safety incidents. Workplace fatality data has been recently removed from the OSHA website. The site used to feature a section that stated the number of people who lost their lives on the job each year and listed the names of those who recently had died.

Since the Trump administration took office earlier this year, there have been changes to some of the agency’s regulations. In March, President Trump signed a resolution to overturn the Volks rule, which had authorized OSHA to extend its enforcement authority of recordkeeping violations from six months to five years.  Companies still are required to maintain logs for the previous five years but now cannot be cited by the agency for incidents beyond the six-month mark.  Business groups have often criticized Obama-era safety rules for slowing down economic growth and the creation of new jobs and it seems that the Trump administration agrees.

OSHA is also slowing down the number of press releases it issues for citations. It wasn’t uncommon to see four or five press releases regarding companies with citations and fines over $40,000. In August, there were only five press releases in total for the entire month.

The OSHA press releases announce citations that allege that a company was found at fault. If cases were resolved, OSHA wouldn’t issue any kind of follow up statement to negate the previous allegation, causing potential harm to a company’s reputation who was named in one of the releases.

Not everyone is happy about it OSHA pulling back. David Michaels, former assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health in Washington and professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. told Business Insurance, “If the stories of workers who are killed aren’t told, they become invisible and there’s little reminder to employers why safety is so important.”

Others support the change in direction. Marc Freedman, executive director of labor law policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce tells Business Insurance that public shaming never really had the impact that the Obama administration thought it would have: “If you look at the rates of injuries and illnesses and fatalities, they never came down in any real appreciable way given the emphasis the previous administration put on that strategy as a way to bring those numbers down.”

For more information on OSHA, visit www.osha.gov

Published at Fri, 15 Sep 2017 18:01:48 +0000

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA has been backing down on the number of press releases naming alleged safety violators and recently removed names from its website.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

A recent article by Business Insurance says the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is continuing to shift away from its policy of publicly shaming employers for workplace safety incidents. Workplace fatality data has been recently removed from the OSHA website. The site used to feature a section that stated the number of people who lost their lives on the job each year and listed the names of those who recently had died.

Since the Trump administration took office earlier this year, there have been changes to some of the agency’s regulations. In March, President Trump signed a resolution to overturn the Volks rule, which had authorized OSHA to extend its enforcement authority of recordkeeping violations from six months to five years.  Companies still are required to maintain logs for the previous five years but now cannot be cited by the agency for incidents beyond the six-month mark.  Business groups have often criticized Obama-era safety rules for slowing down economic growth and the creation of new jobs and it seems that the Trump administration agrees.

OSHA is also slowing down the number of press releases it issues for citations. It wasn’t uncommon to see four or five press releases regarding companies with citations and fines over $40,000. In August, there were only five press releases in total for the entire month.

The OSHA press releases announce citations that allege that a company was found at fault. If cases were resolved, OSHA wouldn’t issue any kind of follow up statement to negate the previous allegation, causing potential harm to a company’s reputation who was named in one of the releases.

Not everyone is happy about it OSHA pulling back. David Michaels, former assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health in Washington and professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. told Business Insurance, “If the stories of workers who are killed aren’t told, they become invisible and there’s little reminder to employers why safety is so important.”

Others support the change in direction. Marc Freedman, executive director of labor law policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce tells Business Insurance that public shaming never really had the impact that the Obama administration thought it would have: “If you look at the rates of injuries and illnesses and fatalities, they never came down in any real appreciable way given the emphasis the previous administration put on that strategy as a way to bring those numbers down.”

For more information on OSHA, visit www.osha.gov

Published at Fri, 15 Sep 2017 18:01:48 +0000

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA has been backing down on the number of press releases naming alleged safety violators and recently removed names from its website.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

A recent article by Business Insurance says the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is continuing to shift away from its policy of publicly shaming employers for workplace safety incidents. Workplace fatality data has been recently removed from the OSHA website. The site used to feature a section that stated the number of people who lost their lives on the job each year and listed the names of those who recently had died.

Since the Trump administration took office earlier this year, there have been changes to some of the agency’s regulations. In March, President Trump signed a resolution to overturn the Volks rule, which had authorized OSHA to extend its enforcement authority of recordkeeping violations from six months to five years.  Companies still are required to maintain logs for the previous five years but now cannot be cited by the agency for incidents beyond the six-month mark.  Business groups have often criticized Obama-era safety rules for slowing down economic growth and the creation of new jobs and it seems that the Trump administration agrees.

OSHA is also slowing down the number of press releases it issues for citations. It wasn’t uncommon to see four or five press releases regarding companies with citations and fines over $40,000. In August, there were only five press releases in total for the entire month.

The OSHA press releases announce citations that allege that a company was found at fault. If cases were resolved, OSHA wouldn’t issue any kind of follow up statement to negate the previous allegation, causing potential harm to a company’s reputation who was named in one of the releases.

Not everyone is happy about it OSHA pulling back. David Michaels, former assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health in Washington and professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. told Business Insurance, “If the stories of workers who are killed aren’t told, they become invisible and there’s little reminder to employers why safety is so important.”

Others support the change in direction. Marc Freedman, executive director of labor law policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce tells Business Insurance that public shaming never really had the impact that the Obama administration thought it would have: “If you look at the rates of injuries and illnesses and fatalities, they never came down in any real appreciable way given the emphasis the previous administration put on that strategy as a way to bring those numbers down.”

For more information on OSHA, visit www.osha.gov

Published at Fri, 15 Sep 2017 18:01:48 +0000

Reliant Roofing Surprises Three Local Families with New Roofs

Reliant Roofing Surprises Three Local Families with New Roofs

Jacksonville, Fla. —  Reliant Roofing recently announced that the three finalists selected for its first annual Every Shingle Heart giveaway will all receive new roofs. Their Every Shingle Heart initiative was created to give back to the community by providing a free roof to a local family in need. Once the nominations came in, the Jacksonville company realized they could not choose just one family. On Aug. 22, they invited all three finalists to the Reliant Roofing office and surprised them with the news.

Angela Billings, Toni Luther and Ruby McMullen all experienced roof damage from Hurricane Matthew. They were ecstatic to learn that they would be receiving brand new roofs. McMullen, who’s on disability, often went without groceries so she could pay her bills on time. Though her home desperately needed a new roof after Matthew, it was out of reach for her. She’ll no longer have to worry.

Luther’s roof damage from Matthew was so severe that she was about to lose her home if it was not replaced. Her daughter Tina, a disabled Veteran, returned home to try to help. “There’s mildew and mold because of the water. It’s been leaking now since the storm,” Velazquez said. “She really couldn’t maintain it because of her health, and so it’s been one thing after the other and I’m trying to pick up the pieces.”

Billings, who recently underwent a double mastectomy and lost her fiancé, is grateful that she and her son will no longer have to worry about constant leaks damaging her home. “Every time it rains, we have some new leak. It’s been difficult ever since Hurricane Mathew,” she says. Now she has hope. She says, “Cancer and losing somebody you love, there’s always someone who has it worse than you. I know it sounds terrible, but it’s true. You look around and you think my life isn’t so bad.”

Reliant Roofing owners Sean Shapiro and Cameron Shouppe were touched by the stories of these local families. Shouppe says, “As soon as I saw their reaction I knew we found the right people. This was a major item causing stress and grief in their life and this was going to make a huge difference for them.” The company looks forward to giving these three deserving families a fresh start.

For more information, visit www.reliantroofing.com/everyshingleheart.

Published at Wed, 20 Sep 2017 12:00:00 +0000

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA has been backing down on the number of press releases naming alleged safety violators and recently removed names from its website.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

A recent article by Business Insurance says the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is continuing to shift away from its policy of publicly shaming employers for workplace safety incidents. Workplace fatality data has been recently removed from the OSHA website. The site used to feature a section that stated the number of people who lost their lives on the job each year and listed the names of those who recently had died.

Since the Trump administration took office earlier this year, there have been changes to some of the agency’s regulations. In March, President Trump signed a resolution to overturn the Volks rule, which had authorized OSHA to extend its enforcement authority of recordkeeping violations from six months to five years.  Companies still are required to maintain logs for the previous five years but now cannot be cited by the agency for incidents beyond the six-month mark.  Business groups have often criticized Obama-era safety rules for slowing down economic growth and the creation of new jobs and it seems that the Trump administration agrees.

OSHA is also slowing down the number of press releases it issues for citations. It wasn’t uncommon to see four or five press releases regarding companies with citations and fines over $40,000. In August, there were only five press releases in total for the entire month.

The OSHA press releases announce citations that allege that a company was found at fault. If cases were resolved, OSHA wouldn’t issue any kind of follow up statement to negate the previous allegation, causing potential harm to a company’s reputation who was named in one of the releases.

Not everyone is happy about it OSHA pulling back. David Michaels, former assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health in Washington and professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. told Business Insurance, “If the stories of workers who are killed aren’t told, they become invisible and there’s little reminder to employers why safety is so important.”

Others support the change in direction. Marc Freedman, executive director of labor law policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce tells Business Insurance that public shaming never really had the impact that the Obama administration thought it would have: “If you look at the rates of injuries and illnesses and fatalities, they never came down in any real appreciable way given the emphasis the previous administration put on that strategy as a way to bring those numbers down.”

For more information on OSHA, visit www.osha.gov

Published at Fri, 15 Sep 2017 18:01:48 +0000

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA has been backing down on the number of press releases naming alleged safety violators and recently removed names from its website.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

A recent article by Business Insurance says the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is continuing to shift away from its policy of publicly shaming employers for workplace safety incidents. Workplace fatality data has been recently removed from the OSHA website. The site used to feature a section that stated the number of people who lost their lives on the job each year and listed the names of those who recently had died.

Since the Trump administration took office earlier this year, there have been changes to some of the agency’s regulations. In March, President Trump signed a resolution to overturn the Volks rule, which had authorized OSHA to extend its enforcement authority of recordkeeping violations from six months to five years.  Companies still are required to maintain logs for the previous five years but now cannot be cited by the agency for incidents beyond the six-month mark.  Business groups have often criticized Obama-era safety rules for slowing down economic growth and the creation of new jobs and it seems that the Trump administration agrees.

OSHA is also slowing down the number of press releases it issues for citations. It wasn’t uncommon to see four or five press releases regarding companies with citations and fines over $40,000. In August, there were only five press releases in total for the entire month.

The OSHA press releases announce citations that allege that a company was found at fault. If cases were resolved, OSHA wouldn’t issue any kind of follow up statement to negate the previous allegation, causing potential harm to a company’s reputation who was named in one of the releases.

Not everyone is happy about it OSHA pulling back. David Michaels, former assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health in Washington and professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. told Business Insurance, “If the stories of workers who are killed aren’t told, they become invisible and there’s little reminder to employers why safety is so important.”

Others support the change in direction. Marc Freedman, executive director of labor law policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce tells Business Insurance that public shaming never really had the impact that the Obama administration thought it would have: “If you look at the rates of injuries and illnesses and fatalities, they never came down in any real appreciable way given the emphasis the previous administration put on that strategy as a way to bring those numbers down.”

For more information on OSHA, visit www.osha.gov

Published at Fri, 15 Sep 2017 18:01:48 +0000

Intricate Roof Meets Refined Design of Coastal Florida Lifestyle Complex

Intricate Roof Meets Refined Design of Coastal Florida Lifestyle Complex

ELK GROVE VILLAGE, Ill. – Serving as a gateway to Florida’s scenic highway 30A, the new 30Avenue mixed-use development is within easy walking distance to several famed beaches on northwest Florida’s panhandle. The distinctive complex offers 130,000 sq. ft. of combined retail and office space. The architecture and landscape of 30Avenue merge sophisticated design with the area’s natural beauty and relaxed coastal lifestyle.
 
30Avenue is composed of one- and two-story buildings clad with white stucco and covered with standing seam metal roofing. Approximately 30,000 sq. ft. of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD .040” aluminum Snap-Clad panels were utilized in a multi-phase installation. The PAC-CLAD panels were finished in Cool Color Cityscape, which was chosen to complement the extensive white stucco, and black shutters and awnings.
 
Design for the project was created by Dougherty Architecture + Design in Destin, Fla. “Our design intent was to create a retail/office complex that was reflective of the nearby beach environment and lifestyle,” said Joe Dougherty, principal. “With nice landscaping and a variety of interesting shapes and forms highlighted by a complex roof design, the project is really engaging.”
 
The Petersen Cityscape color was an important aesthetic factor, Dougherty noted. “Cityscape really enhances the white stucco,” he said. “And, of course, we used aluminum because of the harsh coastal environment. Aluminum stands up well against the weather and the saltwater.”
 
Dougherty Architecture has previous experience with PAC-CLAD products. “Petersen is a manufacturer we usually specify. And the Snap-Clad performance specs met all of our requirements for wind uplift, UV protection, ease of application and warranty,” Dougherty said.
 
Installation of the Petersen panels was done by Ameritech Roofing in Panama City, Fla. Ameritech project manager Philip Jorgenson agreed with architect Dougherty about the complexity of the roof design. “There were lots of different pitches and intersecting planes,” Jorgenson said. “We did extensive custom detailing on site. When you design a complex building like that, you can’t draw every detail. You see what the framers built and then figure out how to flash it. We ordered the panels in general sizes and then cut them to fit on-site. It’s a very efficient way to maximize use of the material. We were really close on the cut list.”
 
Jorgenson also agreed with Dougherty’s opinion of the Snap-Clad profile. “Snap-Clad is a popular panel that we like to use because of the wind rating and the aesthetics of it and because it doesn’t require mechanical seaming,” Jorgenson said. He also likes working with Petersen. “They provide a great product and they’re good people to work with. If there is an issue, they take care of it right away. We’re really pleased with our Petersen relationship,” Jorgenson reports.

For more information, visit www.pac-clad.com.

Published at Wed, 20 Sep 2017 12:00:00 +0000

Roofing Companies Form Asphalt Underlayment Council

Roofing Companies Form Asphalt Underlayment Council

Four roofing companies—Carlisle, Gardner-Gibson, Maryland Paper and Mid-States Asphalt—have formed the Asphalt Underlayment Council (AUC), a new industry association developed to cultivate the long-term success of underlayment products for building envelope applications for both residential and commercial structures.

This new group’s Interim Executive Council was instrumental in identifying the need for an industry council that supports the standardization of underlayment product quality, performance and integrity. Current AUC members include Owens Corning, Polyglass USA, Mule-Hide Manufacturing, GMC Roofing & Building Paper, GAP Roofing, Warrior Roofing Manufacturing and GAF

“With the introduction of new types of roofing underlayment products, it was felt that an industry group was needed to monitor, administer and contribute to product standards,” noted AUC Executive Director Michelle Miller.

Because standards and requirements for roof repair, reroofing, roof recovering and replacement often lack clarification within the definition of underlayment, AUC’s inaugural technical committee will focus on code classifications and industry regulations.

“The pathways to code compliance vary depending on the product type,” said John Woestman, AUC’s technical director. “The continuous influx of newly designed products and ever-evolving regulations requires a strong knowledge base with deep understanding of the codes prevalent in this industry.”

Bringing regulatory issues to light through educational initiatives and industry outreach will be accomplished through raising awareness and advocacy. AUC will actively assist in the development of building codes to ensure the high performance of roofing systems in the future.

“We will work directly with installers and contractors who may not be aware of the various product categories that are occurring in the underlayment industry,” said Robert Almon, AUC Interim Executive Council member. “Understanding the nuances of underlayment as well as discerning codes and comprehending code compliance are vital. With our combined historical experience, AUC is in a prime position to ensure all the issues surrounding underlayment are addressed through a range of resources from an engaged council, committees and membership to a vibrant website that will be launched soon, growing media outreach, literature development and ongoing educational opportunities.”

The group welcomes roofing underlayment firms to join AUC to work to make these important initiatives viable and sustainable. To learn more about the Asphalt Underlayment Council or to ask about membership, email info@aucunderlaymentcouncil.org or call (847) 686-2243.

Published at Thu, 21 Sep 2017 13:00:55 +0000