Monthly ArchiveSeptember 2017

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA has been backing down on the number of press releases naming alleged safety violators and recently removed names from its website.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

A recent article by Business Insurance says the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is continuing to shift away from its policy of publicly shaming employers for workplace safety incidents. Workplace fatality data has been recently removed from the OSHA website. The site used to feature a section that stated the number of people who lost their lives on the job each year and listed the names of those who recently had died.

Since the Trump administration took office earlier this year, there have been changes to some of the agency’s regulations. In March, President Trump signed a resolution to overturn the Volks rule, which had authorized OSHA to extend its enforcement authority of recordkeeping violations from six months to five years.  Companies still are required to maintain logs for the previous five years but now cannot be cited by the agency for incidents beyond the six-month mark.  Business groups have often criticized Obama-era safety rules for slowing down economic growth and the creation of new jobs and it seems that the Trump administration agrees.

OSHA is also slowing down the number of press releases it issues for citations. It wasn’t uncommon to see four or five press releases regarding companies with citations and fines over $40,000. In August, there were only five press releases in total for the entire month.

The OSHA press releases announce citations that allege that a company was found at fault. If cases were resolved, OSHA wouldn’t issue any kind of follow up statement to negate the previous allegation, causing potential harm to a company’s reputation who was named in one of the releases.

Not everyone is happy about it OSHA pulling back. David Michaels, former assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health in Washington and professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. told Business Insurance, “If the stories of workers who are killed aren’t told, they become invisible and there’s little reminder to employers why safety is so important.”

Others support the change in direction. Marc Freedman, executive director of labor law policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce tells Business Insurance that public shaming never really had the impact that the Obama administration thought it would have: “If you look at the rates of injuries and illnesses and fatalities, they never came down in any real appreciable way given the emphasis the previous administration put on that strategy as a way to bring those numbers down.”

For more information on OSHA, visit www.osha.gov

Published at Fri, 15 Sep 2017 18:01:48 +0000

Allied Building Products Corp. Exterior Division Announces Opening of Marmora, N.J. Location

Allied Building Products Corp. Exterior Division Announces Opening of Marmora, N.J. Location

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Allied Building Products Corp. recently announced the expansion of its exterior products division in the New Jersey market with its new branch located in Marmora, N.J.  

The Marmora branch opened its doors on Sept. 1, 2017 providing a solid addition to the company’s strong foundation of 17 branches servicing the exterior and interior markets in New Jersey.  The expansion positions Allied to better serve the Jersey Shore and surrounding communities including; Ocean City, Margate, Seaville, Sea Isle City, Cape May Courthouse, Stone Harbor and Wildwood.  

Featuring both residential and commercial roofing and siding, the branch will carry trusted brands including shingles from GAF, Tamko and Owens Corning, siding and pvc trim from Royal and Tri-Built materials. To complement these brands there will be a range of doors, windows and stone veneer products available. 

Branch Manager, Derek Webber will oversee the Marmora location and will work with District Manager, Phil Orapello bringing a wealth of knowledge and experience to the new location.   

“Allied Building Products proudly continues its expansion into the Jersey Shore community bringing expertise, honesty and integrity to the community to help both restore the shore and keep it on a path to grow” said Orapello. “We look forward to servicing contractors, builders and consumers with the unmatched levels of customer service Allied is known for.” 

For more information, visit www.alliedbuilding.com.

Published at Thu, 21 Sep 2017 12:00:00 +0000

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA has been backing down on the number of press releases naming alleged safety violators and recently removed names from its website.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

A recent article by Business Insurance says the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is continuing to shift away from its policy of publicly shaming employers for workplace safety incidents. Workplace fatality data has been recently removed from the OSHA website. The site used to feature a section that stated the number of people who lost their lives on the job each year and listed the names of those who recently had died.

Since the Trump administration took office earlier this year, there have been changes to some of the agency’s regulations. In March, President Trump signed a resolution to overturn the Volks rule, which had authorized OSHA to extend its enforcement authority of recordkeeping violations from six months to five years.  Companies still are required to maintain logs for the previous five years but now cannot be cited by the agency for incidents beyond the six-month mark.  Business groups have often criticized Obama-era safety rules for slowing down economic growth and the creation of new jobs and it seems that the Trump administration agrees.

OSHA is also slowing down the number of press releases it issues for citations. It wasn’t uncommon to see four or five press releases regarding companies with citations and fines over $40,000. In August, there were only five press releases in total for the entire month.

The OSHA press releases announce citations that allege that a company was found at fault. If cases were resolved, OSHA wouldn’t issue any kind of follow up statement to negate the previous allegation, causing potential harm to a company’s reputation who was named in one of the releases.

Not everyone is happy about it OSHA pulling back. David Michaels, former assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health in Washington and professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. told Business Insurance, “If the stories of workers who are killed aren’t told, they become invisible and there’s little reminder to employers why safety is so important.”

Others support the change in direction. Marc Freedman, executive director of labor law policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce tells Business Insurance that public shaming never really had the impact that the Obama administration thought it would have: “If you look at the rates of injuries and illnesses and fatalities, they never came down in any real appreciable way given the emphasis the previous administration put on that strategy as a way to bring those numbers down.”

For more information on OSHA, visit www.osha.gov

Published at Fri, 15 Sep 2017 18:01:48 +0000

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA has been backing down on the number of press releases naming alleged safety violators and recently removed names from its website.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

A recent article by Business Insurance says the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is continuing to shift away from its policy of publicly shaming employers for workplace safety incidents. Workplace fatality data has been recently removed from the OSHA website. The site used to feature a section that stated the number of people who lost their lives on the job each year and listed the names of those who recently had died.

Since the Trump administration took office earlier this year, there have been changes to some of the agency’s regulations. In March, President Trump signed a resolution to overturn the Volks rule, which had authorized OSHA to extend its enforcement authority of recordkeeping violations from six months to five years.  Companies still are required to maintain logs for the previous five years but now cannot be cited by the agency for incidents beyond the six-month mark.  Business groups have often criticized Obama-era safety rules for slowing down economic growth and the creation of new jobs and it seems that the Trump administration agrees.

OSHA is also slowing down the number of press releases it issues for citations. It wasn’t uncommon to see four or five press releases regarding companies with citations and fines over $40,000. In August, there were only five press releases in total for the entire month.

The OSHA press releases announce citations that allege that a company was found at fault. If cases were resolved, OSHA wouldn’t issue any kind of follow up statement to negate the previous allegation, causing potential harm to a company’s reputation who was named in one of the releases.

Not everyone is happy about it OSHA pulling back. David Michaels, former assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health in Washington and professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. told Business Insurance, “If the stories of workers who are killed aren’t told, they become invisible and there’s little reminder to employers why safety is so important.”

Others support the change in direction. Marc Freedman, executive director of labor law policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce tells Business Insurance that public shaming never really had the impact that the Obama administration thought it would have: “If you look at the rates of injuries and illnesses and fatalities, they never came down in any real appreciable way given the emphasis the previous administration put on that strategy as a way to bring those numbers down.”

For more information on OSHA, visit www.osha.gov

Published at Fri, 15 Sep 2017 18:01:48 +0000

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA has been backing down on the number of press releases naming alleged safety violators and recently removed names from its website.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

A recent article by Business Insurance says the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is continuing to shift away from its policy of publicly shaming employers for workplace safety incidents. Workplace fatality data has been recently removed from the OSHA website. The site used to feature a section that stated the number of people who lost their lives on the job each year and listed the names of those who recently had died.

Since the Trump administration took office earlier this year, there have been changes to some of the agency’s regulations. In March, President Trump signed a resolution to overturn the Volks rule, which had authorized OSHA to extend its enforcement authority of recordkeeping violations from six months to five years.  Companies still are required to maintain logs for the previous five years but now cannot be cited by the agency for incidents beyond the six-month mark.  Business groups have often criticized Obama-era safety rules for slowing down economic growth and the creation of new jobs and it seems that the Trump administration agrees.

OSHA is also slowing down the number of press releases it issues for citations. It wasn’t uncommon to see four or five press releases regarding companies with citations and fines over $40,000. In August, there were only five press releases in total for the entire month.

The OSHA press releases announce citations that allege that a company was found at fault. If cases were resolved, OSHA wouldn’t issue any kind of follow up statement to negate the previous allegation, causing potential harm to a company’s reputation who was named in one of the releases.

Not everyone is happy about it OSHA pulling back. David Michaels, former assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health in Washington and professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. told Business Insurance, “If the stories of workers who are killed aren’t told, they become invisible and there’s little reminder to employers why safety is so important.”

Others support the change in direction. Marc Freedman, executive director of labor law policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce tells Business Insurance that public shaming never really had the impact that the Obama administration thought it would have: “If you look at the rates of injuries and illnesses and fatalities, they never came down in any real appreciable way given the emphasis the previous administration put on that strategy as a way to bring those numbers down.”

For more information on OSHA, visit www.osha.gov

Published at Fri, 15 Sep 2017 18:01:48 +0000

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA has been backing down on the number of press releases naming alleged safety violators and recently removed names from its website.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

A recent article by Business Insurance says the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is continuing to shift away from its policy of publicly shaming employers for workplace safety incidents. Workplace fatality data has been recently removed from the OSHA website. The site used to feature a section that stated the number of people who lost their lives on the job each year and listed the names of those who recently had died.

Since the Trump administration took office earlier this year, there have been changes to some of the agency’s regulations. In March, President Trump signed a resolution to overturn the Volks rule, which had authorized OSHA to extend its enforcement authority of recordkeeping violations from six months to five years.  Companies still are required to maintain logs for the previous five years but now cannot be cited by the agency for incidents beyond the six-month mark.  Business groups have often criticized Obama-era safety rules for slowing down economic growth and the creation of new jobs and it seems that the Trump administration agrees.

OSHA is also slowing down the number of press releases it issues for citations. It wasn’t uncommon to see four or five press releases regarding companies with citations and fines over $40,000. In August, there were only five press releases in total for the entire month.

The OSHA press releases announce citations that allege that a company was found at fault. If cases were resolved, OSHA wouldn’t issue any kind of follow up statement to negate the previous allegation, causing potential harm to a company’s reputation who was named in one of the releases.

Not everyone is happy about it OSHA pulling back. David Michaels, former assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health in Washington and professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. told Business Insurance, “If the stories of workers who are killed aren’t told, they become invisible and there’s little reminder to employers why safety is so important.”

Others support the change in direction. Marc Freedman, executive director of labor law policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce tells Business Insurance that public shaming never really had the impact that the Obama administration thought it would have: “If you look at the rates of injuries and illnesses and fatalities, they never came down in any real appreciable way given the emphasis the previous administration put on that strategy as a way to bring those numbers down.”

For more information on OSHA, visit www.osha.gov

Published at Fri, 15 Sep 2017 18:01:48 +0000

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA has been backing down on the number of press releases naming alleged safety violators and recently removed names from its website.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

A recent article by Business Insurance says the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is continuing to shift away from its policy of publicly shaming employers for workplace safety incidents. Workplace fatality data has been recently removed from the OSHA website. The site used to feature a section that stated the number of people who lost their lives on the job each year and listed the names of those who recently had died.

Since the Trump administration took office earlier this year, there have been changes to some of the agency’s regulations. In March, President Trump signed a resolution to overturn the Volks rule, which had authorized OSHA to extend its enforcement authority of recordkeeping violations from six months to five years.  Companies still are required to maintain logs for the previous five years but now cannot be cited by the agency for incidents beyond the six-month mark.  Business groups have often criticized Obama-era safety rules for slowing down economic growth and the creation of new jobs and it seems that the Trump administration agrees.

OSHA is also slowing down the number of press releases it issues for citations. It wasn’t uncommon to see four or five press releases regarding companies with citations and fines over $40,000. In August, there were only five press releases in total for the entire month.

The OSHA press releases announce citations that allege that a company was found at fault. If cases were resolved, OSHA wouldn’t issue any kind of follow up statement to negate the previous allegation, causing potential harm to a company’s reputation who was named in one of the releases.

Not everyone is happy about it OSHA pulling back. David Michaels, former assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health in Washington and professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. told Business Insurance, “If the stories of workers who are killed aren’t told, they become invisible and there’s little reminder to employers why safety is so important.”

Others support the change in direction. Marc Freedman, executive director of labor law policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce tells Business Insurance that public shaming never really had the impact that the Obama administration thought it would have: “If you look at the rates of injuries and illnesses and fatalities, they never came down in any real appreciable way given the emphasis the previous administration put on that strategy as a way to bring those numbers down.”

For more information on OSHA, visit www.osha.gov

Published at Fri, 15 Sep 2017 18:01:48 +0000

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA has been backing down on the number of press releases naming alleged safety violators and recently removed names from its website.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

A recent article by Business Insurance says the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is continuing to shift away from its policy of publicly shaming employers for workplace safety incidents. Workplace fatality data has been recently removed from the OSHA website. The site used to feature a section that stated the number of people who lost their lives on the job each year and listed the names of those who recently had died.

Since the Trump administration took office earlier this year, there have been changes to some of the agency’s regulations. In March, President Trump signed a resolution to overturn the Volks rule, which had authorized OSHA to extend its enforcement authority of recordkeeping violations from six months to five years.  Companies still are required to maintain logs for the previous five years but now cannot be cited by the agency for incidents beyond the six-month mark.  Business groups have often criticized Obama-era safety rules for slowing down economic growth and the creation of new jobs and it seems that the Trump administration agrees.

OSHA is also slowing down the number of press releases it issues for citations. It wasn’t uncommon to see four or five press releases regarding companies with citations and fines over $40,000. In August, there were only five press releases in total for the entire month.

The OSHA press releases announce citations that allege that a company was found at fault. If cases were resolved, OSHA wouldn’t issue any kind of follow up statement to negate the previous allegation, causing potential harm to a company’s reputation who was named in one of the releases.

Not everyone is happy about it OSHA pulling back. David Michaels, former assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health in Washington and professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. told Business Insurance, “If the stories of workers who are killed aren’t told, they become invisible and there’s little reminder to employers why safety is so important.”

Others support the change in direction. Marc Freedman, executive director of labor law policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce tells Business Insurance that public shaming never really had the impact that the Obama administration thought it would have: “If you look at the rates of injuries and illnesses and fatalities, they never came down in any real appreciable way given the emphasis the previous administration put on that strategy as a way to bring those numbers down.”

For more information on OSHA, visit www.osha.gov

Published at Fri, 15 Sep 2017 18:01:48 +0000

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA has been backing down on the number of press releases naming alleged safety violators and recently removed names from its website.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

A recent article by Business Insurance says the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is continuing to shift away from its policy of publicly shaming employers for workplace safety incidents. Workplace fatality data has been recently removed from the OSHA website. The site used to feature a section that stated the number of people who lost their lives on the job each year and listed the names of those who recently had died.

Since the Trump administration took office earlier this year, there have been changes to some of the agency’s regulations. In March, President Trump signed a resolution to overturn the Volks rule, which had authorized OSHA to extend its enforcement authority of recordkeeping violations from six months to five years.  Companies still are required to maintain logs for the previous five years but now cannot be cited by the agency for incidents beyond the six-month mark.  Business groups have often criticized Obama-era safety rules for slowing down economic growth and the creation of new jobs and it seems that the Trump administration agrees.

OSHA is also slowing down the number of press releases it issues for citations. It wasn’t uncommon to see four or five press releases regarding companies with citations and fines over $40,000. In August, there were only five press releases in total for the entire month.

The OSHA press releases announce citations that allege that a company was found at fault. If cases were resolved, OSHA wouldn’t issue any kind of follow up statement to negate the previous allegation, causing potential harm to a company’s reputation who was named in one of the releases.

Not everyone is happy about it OSHA pulling back. David Michaels, former assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health in Washington and professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. told Business Insurance, “If the stories of workers who are killed aren’t told, they become invisible and there’s little reminder to employers why safety is so important.”

Others support the change in direction. Marc Freedman, executive director of labor law policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce tells Business Insurance that public shaming never really had the impact that the Obama administration thought it would have: “If you look at the rates of injuries and illnesses and fatalities, they never came down in any real appreciable way given the emphasis the previous administration put on that strategy as a way to bring those numbers down.”

For more information on OSHA, visit www.osha.gov

Published at Fri, 15 Sep 2017 18:01:48 +0000

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA Pulls Back on Public Shaming

OSHA has been backing down on the number of press releases naming alleged safety violators and recently removed names from its website.

By Karen Edwards, RCS Editor.

A recent article by Business Insurance says the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is continuing to shift away from its policy of publicly shaming employers for workplace safety incidents. Workplace fatality data has been recently removed from the OSHA website. The site used to feature a section that stated the number of people who lost their lives on the job each year and listed the names of those who recently had died.

Since the Trump administration took office earlier this year, there have been changes to some of the agency’s regulations. In March, President Trump signed a resolution to overturn the Volks rule, which had authorized OSHA to extend its enforcement authority of recordkeeping violations from six months to five years.  Companies still are required to maintain logs for the previous five years but now cannot be cited by the agency for incidents beyond the six-month mark.  Business groups have often criticized Obama-era safety rules for slowing down economic growth and the creation of new jobs and it seems that the Trump administration agrees.

OSHA is also slowing down the number of press releases it issues for citations. It wasn’t uncommon to see four or five press releases regarding companies with citations and fines over $40,000. In August, there were only five press releases in total for the entire month.

The OSHA press releases announce citations that allege that a company was found at fault. If cases were resolved, OSHA wouldn’t issue any kind of follow up statement to negate the previous allegation, causing potential harm to a company’s reputation who was named in one of the releases.

Not everyone is happy about it OSHA pulling back. David Michaels, former assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health in Washington and professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. told Business Insurance, “If the stories of workers who are killed aren’t told, they become invisible and there’s little reminder to employers why safety is so important.”

Others support the change in direction. Marc Freedman, executive director of labor law policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce tells Business Insurance that public shaming never really had the impact that the Obama administration thought it would have: “If you look at the rates of injuries and illnesses and fatalities, they never came down in any real appreciable way given the emphasis the previous administration put on that strategy as a way to bring those numbers down.”

For more information on OSHA, visit www.osha.gov

Published at Fri, 15 Sep 2017 18:01:48 +0000