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Re-Roofing of Shopping Center Covers Over 75,000 Square Feet

Re-Roofing of Shopping Center Covers Over 75,000 Square Feet

Southgate Shopping Center: Sebring, Florida

Roofing contractors often find themselves tackling re-roofs at shopping centers in piece-meal fashion, doing sections over the years as the budget allows. When property manager Southern Management and Development decided to remodel the entire Southgate Shopping Center in Sebring, Fla., in conjunction with Publix Markets’ replacement of their existing store at the location, they looked to Advanced Roofing to get the job done.

The scope of work included re-roofing three large sections of the retail plaza and a drugstore on the property. The roofing portions totaled 79,556 square feet.

Roof System

The roof specified was a two-ply modified bitumen system from Johns Manville. In the three large sections of the plaza, the existing built-up roof was completely torn off, while the drugstore was a re-cover project, notes Andrew Vik, estimator and project manager with Advanced Roofing’s Tampa branch, which operates under branch manager Michael Landolfi.

Roofing work started in November 2016 and was completed in February 2017. After the existing roof was removed, crews installed 2-inch polyiso to the steel deck. “We mechanically fastened that with a half-inch USG SecuRock cover board through the steel deck,” notes Vik. “The two plies of modified bitumen were then torch applied, a smooth base sheet and a white granulated cap sheet.”

On the drugstore, the roof was vacuumed, and the cover board and two plies were installed over the top of the old roof system.

In addition to the roofing scope, Advanced Roofing’s HVAC division installed and removed heating and air conditioning units and replaced some obstructive ductwork. “We had our own HVAC people working with our roofing crews, so it was easy to coordinate everything,” notes Vik. “We had HVAC installations on three of the buildings, and we remounted existing units on two of the buildings. There was also a lot of demolition on the south building, as there were several derelict units that
had been sitting there for quite some time. Those had to be hoisted off there and taken out.”

A Challenging Project

Logistics are often a challenge with a shopping center that remains open to the public, notes Vik. “You have to load and unload multiple levels of the roof at different times,” he says. “Customer relations is also a challenge; you have to keep everyone happy and ask a lot of questions. The construction manager has to do a lot of P.R. when he’s there.”

Demolition portions of the project were done at night and application during the day, so business at the mall was never disrupted. Traffic in the parking area was also a key concern.

“Setup areas had to be barricaded and marked off while we were loading and unloading,” Vik says. “There was even a drive under bridge connecting two buildings that had to be re-roofed, so we always had to be mindful of people below.”

Parapet walls did not surround all portions of the roof, so safety precautions included a safety perimeter; employees outside the perimeter had to be harnessed and tied off to a portable fall protection anchor system by Raptor.

The project went off without a hitch, according to Vik. “The mall was 100 percent open during the entire project,” he says. “Things went very smoothly— especially for everything that was involved. One of our mottoes is, ‘The harder the job, the better.’ We like a challenge. We take on a lot of projects other companies shy away from.”

The keys to his company’s success are coordination and versatility, states Vik. “We do it all,” he says. “We didn’t have to get anybody from outside the company to work on the project. We did all the roofing, all of the HVAC, and all of the hoisting was done in-house. We’ve also got lightning protection inhouse, and we have a solar division. We have a great team. Everyone does their part to get the bids out and get the jobs done. It’s the best team I’ve ever worked with.”

Team

Roofing Contractor:Advanced Roofing Inc., Tampa, Fla.
Consultant:CBA Roof Consulting LLC, Lake Worth, Fla.
Roof System Manufacturer and Technical Support: Johns Manville, Denver

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Published at Wed, 26 Jul 2017 21:00:53 +0000

GAF Blog

GAF Blog

Until now, there has been surprisingly little research into the overall thermal impact of the fasteners that penetrate roofing insulation. A recent study shows that even relatively conservative use of fasteners creates enough thermal bridging between the roof deck and the insulation to substantially reduce the overall thermal performance of the building envelope.

Guest blogger Eric K. Olson, P.E. explains his research (Olson, Saldanha, and Hsu, “Thermal Performance Evaluation of Roofing Details to Improve Thermal Efficiency and Condensation Resistance,” ASTM Roofing Research and Systems and Standards Development, Vol 8, STP 1590, ASTM International, November 2015)

Introduction

Thermal insulation in roofing systems plays a substantial role in the overall thermal performance of the building envelope.  Energy code requirements for the R-value of the roofing insulation are becoming ever more stringent, requiring increased insulation thickness. Mechanical fasteners are commonly used to secure the insulation and roofing membrane to the structural roof deck.

Each metal fastener creates a thermal bridge that reduces the effectiveness of the insulation.  For a single fastener, the impact would probably be negligible. A typical roof, though, may include thousands of fasteners. The effect of these myriad thermal bridges adds up. That is, the combined impact of the fasteners can substantially reduce thermal performance.

Considering the potential impact involved, there is surprisingly little information in the roofing industry regarding the overall thermal impact of fasteners on roofing insulation. To explore and help quantify these thermal impacts, some colleagues and I decided to perform and publish the results of three-dimensional computer heat flow models of fasteners and other roofing details that penetrate the roofing insulation (Olson, Saldanha, and Hsu, “Thermal Performance Evaluation of Roofing Details to Improve Thermal Efficiency and Condensation Resistance,” ASTM Roofing Research and Systems and Standards Development, Vol 8, STP 1590, ASTM International, November 2015).

EverGuard-thermal-bridging

Thermal Bridging. Image by GAF.

Modeling and Analysis

We modeled a roofing system with 4 in. of polyisocyanurate insulation and 1/2 in. gypsum cover board with a nominal R-value of R-27.0, over steel deck, with the insulation fastened using steel plates and #14 roofing screws with a diameter of 0.214 in.

Modeling one fastener with plate penetrating a one sq. ft. area of insulation (e.g., sixteen fasteners per 4 ft. by 4 ft. insulation board), we found the following:

  1. Case 1: With the steel plate above the gypsum cover board, the fastener and plate drop the R-value from R-27.0 to R-19.2 (a 29% reduction in R-value).
  2. Case 2: Placing the plate beneath adhered gypsum cover board provides little improvement due to poor thermal resistance of the gypsum, raising the R-value from R-19.2 to R-19.5.

Swapping out the gypsum cover board with 1/2 in. high-density polyisocyanurate cover board raises the nominal R-value of the system from R-27.0 to R-29.0.  Repeating the above analysis, we found the following:

  1. Case 3: With the steel plate above the polyisocyanurate cover board, the fastener and plate drop the R-value from R-29.0 to R-21.2. This is a 27% reduction in R-value as compared to the nominal R-value using polyisocyanurate cover board.
  2. Case 4: Placing the plate beneath adhered high-density polyisocyanurate cover board raises the R-value from R-21.2 to R-23.8. This is a 9% improvement as compared to the case with the plate on top of the polyisocyanurate cover board, but still an 18% reduction as compared to the nominal R-value using polyisocyanurate cover board.

The above cases represent high rates of fastening (one per sq. ft.) that may be encountered at corners or perimeter zones.  In practice, field-of-roof zones require fewer fasteners and have greater area, and thus have a greater influence on thermal performance than corner and perimeter zones.  The figure below graphs the effective R-value versus the number of evenly spaced #12 fasteners and steel plates per 4 ft. x 4 ft. insulation board, using the conditions of Case 1 (fasteners through and plates above gypsum cover board) above.

Change in effective R-value Relative to Number of Fasteners for Case 1

Effective R Value

As can be seen above, the thermal bridging created by even light fastening rates can be significant.  A pattern of five fasteners per board, frequently seen in field areas of a roof, drops the effective R-value to R-24.  This is an 11% reduction in R-value.

Our work to date indicates that mechanically fastening roofing insulation substantially reduces the roof’s thermal performance as compared to a similar system without fasteners. More work remains to be done to quantify thermal bridging through roofing systems. The influence of fastener diameter, the use of less conductive fasteners (like stainless steel), and the use of polymer plates in reducing thermal bridging should be explored.

A better understanding of these thermally bridging elements will help identify options to help mitigate their effect. This, in turn, will help designers to better specify the thermal performance characteristics of their roofing systems. 

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Upgraded Cap Hammer Offers Improved Staple Design

Upgraded Cap Hammer Offers Improved Staple Design

Stinger Cap HammerNational Nail’s Stinger brand introduces the newly upgraded CH38-2 Cap Hammer. The CH38-2 is an economical, non-pneumatic cap fastener that eliminates the need for hoses and compressors—which also improves safety.  Best practice applications for the CH38-2 which features the holding power of a 1-inch cap, includes house wrap, rolled insulation, and roofing felt. The CH38-2 has been enhanced with increased internal handle strength, an improved staple design, track and spring, stronger welds and an added handle grip, all for maximum reliability and performance. The CH38-2 Cap Hammer has a fastener capacity of 168 full, 1-inch collated plastic caps and 3/8 -inch crown staples.

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Published at Wed, 26 Jul 2017 13:49:39 +0000

Engage With Potential Customers on the Social Media Platform They Use Most

Engage With Potential Customers on the Social Media Platform They Use Most

Social media can be an exciting territory for contractors looking to promote their businesses in a relatively inexpensive, but impactful, way. But it can be equally overwhelming with the abundance of social platforms available, as well as the nuances involved for marketing on each one.

If you’re new to marketing your business socially, Facebook is a great place to start. It’s an easy-to-use platform that provides several features for connecting with potential customers locally and nationally. Or, if your business is already active on the platform but not seeing much return, there are simple ways to begin improving your activity today.

Read on to learn simple tips and advice on how to effectively promote your roofing business on Facebook.

Why Focus on Facebook?

It’s important to note why it is relevant to establish and maintain a presence for your business on Facebook.

First and foremost, your customers are already active on the platform. Facebook continues to be the most popular social media platform, as cited by the Pew Research Center, where 79 percent of online adults have a profile. In fact, the number of Facebook users is more than double the number of people who use other social platforms, such as Instagram (32 percent), LinkedIn (29 percent), Twitter (24 percent) or Pinterest (31 percent).

Plus, establishing and maintaining a Facebook page can also be beneficial in driving visitors to your website. In fact, search engines tend to reward businesses with a strong social following through higher organic rankings. In other words, the more people who are engaged with your company on Facebook, the better odds your business will show up sooner in a potential customer’s search results for a local roofing contractor.

Further, the platform is also a great way to create a sense of connection with your internal team. For instance, Facebook can be used to showcase your company culture, share news and engage with your own employees—especially if you’re a large contractor with multiple locations.

Useful Strategies to Grow Your Page

Profile setup: Building a solid foundation of followers begins with setting up your profile correctly. Be sure to set up a Business Page instead of a personal Facebook page. This way, current and future customers can “like” your page, or become a fan, and keep up-to-date on the latest news from your company.

Also, it’s important to have a profile image and cover art (the large image at the top of the page), as well as complete details about your business on the “About” page, including a description of your business, location, contact information, services offered, hours, website and more.

Tip:

If you already have an existing account that was set up as a personal profile, you can convert it into a business page at facebook.com/business.

Content sharing: Once your page is set up, it’s time to start sharing content. Begin with one or two posts per week, and then gradually start increasing your posting schedule as you gain a more established following.
Think of Facebook as an extension of your website to tell customers more about your business in an inviting and personal, but still professional, atmosphere.

Looking for content ideas? Think about sharing your knowledge and expertise: your project work! Take before-and-after photos of projects that showcase a new roof installation or repair. Or if it’s a long-term project, document it each day with photos or videos that explain the installation process you’re undergoing, the products you’re using and more. Make sure you have your customer’s consent before posting details or pictures about any project.

Also, do you have a company blog on your website? If so, share out individual posts with a “teaser” on the details the article contains, along with a link back to the specific post. This helps to establish your credibility as a knowledgeable professional, but can also help to drive potential customers back to your website to learn more. If you’re still working to set up your company blog, another option is to publish a “Note” from the left sidebar of your Facebook business page. This long-form Facebook post is a great alternative while you work toward setting up your blog online.

You can also consider sharing links to blog posts from a manufacturer whose products you use. They often provide helpful blog articles with tips and advice for both contractors and homeowners—so you may even find something of value to you in the process!

Lastly, you can use your page as a way to share positive customer testimonials in the form of photos and videos. Again, it’s important to ensure you first have your customer’s consent before sharing their testimonials. Be sure to also encourage your satisfied customers to submit their own Facebook reviews for a job well done. These reviews allow them to share their experiences and rate your performance directly on your Facebook page, which can help facilitate future business and leads.

Tip:

Facebook can also be used as a means to share company promotions, special holiday or seasonal incentives, and events you may be hosting or attending.

Page promotion: As you start to proactively post useful content, you’ll begin to establish a following on your page. However, there are also several paid promotion tactics you can use to increase your page’s reach and engagement.
One popular paid tactic is a pay-per-click (PPC) campaign, which is a form of advertising where you pay a set amount each time someone clicks on an ad you’ve produced. Determine what you would ultimately like users to do, and create a post or simple ad that prompts them to take that action. For example, you can drive homeowners to visit your company website, provide their contact information for a free quote, like your Facebook page, download a coupon and more.

If you have a particularly interesting post that has been performing well on your page (maybe it has received a lot of positive comments, for example) and you’d like it to reach even more people, consider “boosting” or sponsoring that post. This means putting a set amount of money behind promoting a post, say $100, to expand its reach. Geo-targeting, or selecting a specific audience and geography you’d like to reach, helps amplify your message to the right people—your targeted customers.

Tip:

Avoid using text in your images for paid posts or campaigns. Facebook guidelines reduce the reach of these images as the system considers them too “spammy” or ad-centric and cluttered. In many cases, image text could prevent your promotion from running entirely.

Highlighted Contractor Examples

Wondering how to apply some of these strategies? Learn more from a couple of roofing contractors who are part of IKO’s ShieldPRO plus+ Contractor Program and are already successfully using them on Facebook:

Chad’s Roofing, Gilroy, Calif.:

  • Frequently posts project testimonials and before-and-after photos, along with job site videos that explain roofing processes to homeowners.
  • Consistently responds to questions/comments posted on the page.
  • Uses Facebook (and linked Instagram account) to promote business rather than a traditional website.

Able Roofing, Columbus, Ohio:

  • Collects and displays several homeowner reviews on its Facebook page (more than 50 at the time of writing).
  • Shares links to blog posts on the Able Roofing website, which include helpful tips for homeowners related to home improvement, trends and renovation projects.
  • Promotes company news and local events, as well as national holidays.

If you’re looking to grow your leads and engage with future customers, using these strategies on Facebook is a great place to start. Also, be sure to check out the IKO blog for even more helpful business tips and advice!

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Published at Tue, 25 Jul 2017 16:00:33 +0000

Innovative Roofing Insulation Appeals to Owners, Architects

Innovative Roofing Insulation Appeals to Owners, Architects

Because Rich-E-Board roofing insulation is light and easy to install, it lowers the cost of delivery and handling and can reduce labor costs by more than half.

Because Rich-E-Board roofing insulation is light and easy to install, it lowers the cost of delivery and handling and can reduce labor costs by more than half.

It’s exceptionally thin and easy to install. It delivers an R-value of 50 to commercial, industrial and government buildings. Now, Rich-E-Board, the innovative new roofing insulation, is enjoying a groundswell of interest from building
owners, contractors and architects seeking to drive down construction costs and boost energy efficiency.

Rich-E-Board recently received a patent for its proprietary Vacuum Insulated Panel—two polymeric foam cover boards that sandwich the panel—and the adhesive ribbons that bind the boards and panel together. This ultra-thin insulation offers a certified alternative to a huge commercial roofing market—billions of square feet in construction every year—challenged with
meeting stringent standards for energy efficiency.

While conventional insulation requires a thickness of 15 inches to reach an R-value of 50, Rich-E-Board achieves the same result at just 1.5 inches thick. Rich-E-Board can be installed on most roof deck types, including ballasted roof systems, and can support all conventional low-slope roof systems.

Rich-E-Board’s design delivers significant advantages:

  • Lower energy bills: Achieving an R-value of 50 can cut a building’s heating and cooling costs by 8 to 10 percent, according to the GSA.
  • Simpler retrofits: Rich-E-Board enables retrofitted structures to achieve required R-values in less time, with fewer materials, and without costly and destructive building modifications.
  • Reduced construction costs: Because Rich-E-Board is light and easy to install, it lowers the cost of delivery and handling and can reduce labor costs by more than half.
  • Design flexibility: With its slim profile— especially compared with multi-layer insulation— Rich-E-Board saves space, expanding the design options for architects.

Rich-E-Board is also fireproof and water and mold resistant, notes Joanne Collins, president and CEO of R-50 Systems, maker of Rich-EBoard. “Our team focused on creating a game-changing alternative,” Collins says. “Rich-E-Board fills a significant
void in the marketplace by providing an insulation system capable of meeting today’s tougher energy standards.”

Success in the Field

Rich-E-Board has made a successful transition from the drawing board to the marketplace. Owners and architects have taken advantage of the insulation’s slim profile and high R-value on several building projects.

At a government building in Chicago, for example, owners chose to install 3,600 square-feet of Rich-E-Board as part of a roof retrofit aimed at lowering lifetime energy costs. Rich-E-Board’s slim profile also cut construction costs by more than $20,000 by streamlining design and installation.

At the Cohen Courthouse in Camden, N.J., Rich-E-Board was selected for the roof retrofit, eliminating the need for expensive building modifications that would have been required for conventional insulation. The decision lowered the project cost by $200,000.

Earlier this year, Rich-E-Board was awarded a patent for its design. More recently, the insulation earned its first LEED 4 designation.

“We’re seeing a huge increase in Rich-E-Board as the roofing market learns more about the benefits it brings to the commercial roofing,” Collins says. “This product fills a significant void by providing an insulation system capable
of meeting today’s tougher energy standards.”

Collins notes that, in addition to the $5 billion annual market for commercial roofing, Rich-E-Board can be used in walls and other building applications. Rich-E-Board is 99 percent recyclable and made entirely in the U.S.

PHOTOS: R-50 SYSTEMS

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Published at Tue, 25 Jul 2017 18:00:39 +0000

Key Priorities for Fire Station Project Includes Visual Appeal, Resistance to Algae and Wind

Key Priorities for Fire Station Project Includes Visual Appeal, Resistance to Algae and Wind

When the fire station decided to replace its aging steep-slope system, the goals included finding a system that would look good, stand up to high winds and resist algae growth.

When the fire station decided to replace its aging steep-slope system, the goals included finding a system that would look good, stand up to high winds and resist algae growth.

The firemen and firewomen of the Burlington Fire Department, located in Burlington, Wash., reportedly respond to about 1,800 service calls a year. The members of the department are on call 24/7, handling a variety of emergencies, both big and small.

Whether it is fighting a fire, performing a search and rescue, or something as simple as retrieving a driver’s keys from the car, the city’s bravest are too busy to have roof issues make their days more difficult. When the fire station began to experience leaks that required countless repairs and patchwork solutions, the City of Burlington knew it was time to replace the entire roofing system and ensure that the firefighters were safe from the elements.

Over the last few years, leaks began to appear more frequently in the fire station’s roof, with the worst leaks occurring in the paramedic’s quarters and in the firehouse’s workout room. The water would drip down on the firefighters and ceiling tiles became discolored, creating an unpleasant appearance throughout the firehouse. The intense winds in the area would also cause the shingles of the roof to become loose and fly off.

“The roof was patched several times over the years. We filled the voids as we went,” says Brandon Bond, a lieutenant on the Burlington Fire Department for the last 10 years. “After a while, the patches and replacements weren’t working and the leaks were getting harder to fix. At that point, we knew it was time to replace the whole roof.”

For their new roof, the city wanted a material that was visually appealing and performed against algae and wind. Also, because this was a city project, they wanted to find a contractor who was nearby and a roofing material that was manufactured locally—all of which showed pride in their community. When they considered the criteria, along with the size of the roof—24,000 square feet—the city chose to go with asphalt shingles because they provided a high level of longevity and durability while keeping it affordable.

Asphalt shingles offered a heavyweight, wind-resistant roofing material with a number of color options, making it the optimal choice among the design team. Wind resistance was an important factor because the old roofing system sustained considerable wind damage. The winds in the area can reach 65-70 miles per hour.

Selecting the Right System

Cascade Roofing Company from Burlington was hired to install the new roof on the fire station. The company has been in business for nearly 30 years and works on both commercial and residential roofing projects. The owner of Cascade, Rick Steiner, explains that asphalt shingles were used on the fire station for a number of reasons.

“Shingles were used because of the different pitch heights of the roof, their affordability and their great look,” Steiner says. “The algae-resistance was also a must. Algae grows like weeds in Washington, due to the moisture in the air and fluctuating temperatures.”

Algae flourishes in humid climates and its spores can be carried by the wind. The temperate but rainy weather found in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. produces an environment for algae to thrive in. While algae is not known to cause damage to roofs, the dark streaks are unsightly.

“Burlington is very wet, whether it’s raining or if we’re dealing with the humidity,” says Lauren Wilkins, a firefighter at the Burlington Fire Department since 2012. “We wanted the new roof to provide some resistance to algae so that it looked good as compared to the other surrounding roofs in the area.”

Cascade used shingle manufacturer PABCO Roofing Products, located in nearby Tacoma, Wash. PABCO’s algae-resistant Paramount Signature Cut Shingle in Oakwood color was selected for the project because it provided exceptional curb appeal. An aggressive modified sealant was used as well as high-wind shingle application—6 nails—to add resistance to wind uplift. PABCO Paramount starter shingles were applied over PABCO Universal Starter to provide a double-layer base. A synthetic underlayment along with an ice and water shield on the leading edges were also used. Shasta HD Ridge was applied to the ridge and hips of the roof to complement the roofline.

The roof system covers 24,000 square feet. An aggressive modified sealant and a high-wind shingle application using six nails add resistance to wind uplift.

The roof system covers 24,000 square feet. An aggressive modified sealant and a high-wind shingle application using six nails add resistance to wind uplift.

Keeping it Local

The City of Burlington was thrilled to choose local companies for the project. The manufacturer, contractor and even the supplier were all located nearby. This provided Cascade an avenue for necessary materials to be delivered quickly, allowing them to stay under budget and ahead of schedule. The project took about two weeks and 230 squares of shingles to complete, which is equivalent to the number of shingles necessary for the company to roof six or seven regular-sized homes.

“It’s easily the biggest shingle job I’ve ever done,” Steiner says. “But the design of the building along with the high-profile look of the shingles made the project look incredible. The city has a roof that’s going to last a very long time.”

Steiner also points out how smooth operations were due to the local theme of the project. “Everything was on-time. The supplier was right across the street and very easy to work with,” Steiner notes. “Even the weather cooperated – it made a potentially difficult project that much easier.”

The firefighters felt the same way. “We thought the hardest thing about the renovation would be continuing our daily operations, but we didn’t run into any problems,” Wilkins says. “They were very friendly and easy to coordinate with when moving equipment. There were no horror stories here.”

Since the renovation was completed, the firefighters are very happy with the new roof. The firemen and firewomen of the Burlington Fire Department can now focus on keeping the residents of Burlington safe.

The unique installation of the roof also earned Cascade Roofing and the fire station project the 2017 Bronze Award in the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) Quality Asphalt Roofing Case-Study (QARC) Awards Program. Each year, ARMA seeks out the most beautiful, affordable and reliable asphalt roofing systems in North America.

Award-winning projects are selected based on innovation, performance and beauty, and recognize projects that lead the way in areas like weather protection, green roofing or unique utilization of asphalt shingles in a roofing system. ARMA is currently accepting submissions for both low- and steep-slope roofing project installations completed in 2017 for its 2018 awards program. Roofing contractors can submit multiple projects through Dec. 31, and there is no fee to enter.

For more information about asphalt roofing systems, the QARC awards program and more, visit the website.

PHOTOS: JAROD TROW PHOTOGRAPHY

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Published at Mon, 24 Jul 2017 19:00:23 +0000

Overcome Procrastination in Three Easy Steps

Overcome Procrastination in Three Easy Steps

You are a dedicated business owner. I know this because you are taking time to increase your professional development by reading this magazine and this article.

Because you are a business owner who is dedicated to success, it would make sense that you don’t procrastinate—right? You can quickly and easily accomplish all the important tasks and projects that help move your business forward. Your taxes are completed ahead of time. You are never up late at night looking for data to complete an estimate. You never have to redo tasks because you made errors as you were trying to finish by the deadline.

Before you stop reading in frustration, know that according to Tim Pychyl, author of Solving the Procrastination Puzzle, everyone procrastinates. So, you are not alone!

The question really becomes, how do you overcome your procrastination? There isn’t a “one size fits all” solution to the procrastination challenge. However, there is a process you can follow to find your solution.
Use the acronym A.W.E.
A – Awareness. What are some of the tasks you procrastinate on most often?
W – Work. What are some strategies to help put yourself in motion?
E – Evaluation. What worked and how do you do more of it?

The Three-Step Process

Let’s start with awareness. What are some of the tasks that typically cause you to procrastinate? Do you avoid invoicing clients? Or posting on social media? Or sending estimates? Or evaluating employees? Or doing customer service follow-up calls? Or meeting with your accountant? Or creating a marketing plan? Or creating a business plan?

Start to really think about the tasks you put off. Now that you have a good idea about what those tasks are, it’s time to create a strategy to overcome procrastination. This is the work phase.

According to Pychyl, we procrastinate when we find a task unattractive. The more unattractive, the more we procrastinate. Unattractive tasks have one or more of the following traits. They are:

  • Boring
  • Frustrating
  • Difficult
  • Unstructured or ambiguous
  • Lacking in personal meaning
  • Lacking in intrinsic rewards (not fun!)
  • Which trait corresponds to your task? Do you procrastinate when it comes to invoicing clients because you find paperwork boring and frustrating? Do you put off evaluating employees because you find conflict (or perceived conflict) difficult? Have you decided that you’ll do a marketing plan next year (or the year after that) because the whole idea is ambiguous and you don’t even know where to start?

    Once you can identify the trait that’s holding you back, you can create a strategy to help move yourself into action. If a task is boring, make it fun. (OK, maybe paperwork won’t ever be fun, but it can be less boring.) Play music loud, challenge yourself to finish the task in under 20 minutes, and reward yourself when it is done.

    If creating a marketing plan seems ambiguous, add some structure to it. Talk it out with some colleagues. Consult with a marketing professional. Do some reading on marketing plans. Decide what your goals are for the plan. Figure out just one step. Once you’ve identified even one step, it becomes much easier to move into action.

    Finally, evaluation. When you can do more of what works and less of what doesn’t, life becomes much easier. Yet you seldom take the time to slow down long enough to think through what is working! Take 10 minutes to check back at the end of the week. Which strategies worked? Where are you procrastinating less? Where do you still need to problem solve?

    By following the steps spelled out in A.W.E., you will be able to reduce the amount of time you procrastinate and increase your capacity to accomplish more in less time. Which leaves you with a lot more time to do all those things you love to do!

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    Published at Mon, 24 Jul 2017 20:00:25 +0000

    Desperate times, desperate measures?

    Desperate times, desperate measures?

    Column written by Ambika Puniani Bailey, NRCA’s vice president of communications and production as it appears in Professional Roofing magazine’s July issue.

    Construction worker climbing ladderThe construction industry, indeed the entire U.S., is struggling to fill jobs as the unemployment rate dipped to 4.4 percent in April—the lowest it’s been since the Great Recession. (The federal government considers full U.S. employment to be 4.7 percent.)

    Yes, employing immigrant labor is one option though hiring foreign workers places multiple paperwork burdens on employers plus other hurdles to clear, such as language barriers. Instead, according to the Center for Economic and Policy Research, more employers are actively recruiting and hiring those with criminal records.

    In fact, according to Bloomberg BNA, a medium security prison in Sheridan, Ill., has been training inmates in carpentry and plumbing skills. And the Association of Chamber of Commerce Executives and the Council of State Governments Justice Center jointly agreed to help chamber members hire ex-offenders.

    The numbers are astounding. According to the Center for Economic and Policy Research, there are between 14 million and 15.8 million working-age people with felony convictions and 70 million with an arrest or conviction record. And Evanston, Ill.-based Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management reports 650,000 prisoners are set free annually in the U.S.

    When asked about hiring those with criminal records, National Association of Home Builders CEO Gerald Howard told Bloomberg BNA: “We have a huge labor shortage. This has become a focus out of necessity.”Felons

    As an added perk, employers that hire and retain ex-felons are offered a federal Work Opportunity Tax Credit. (The same tax credit applies to those who hire and retain veterans.) And research conducted by Northwestern University showed ex-offenders are no more likely to be fired than non-offenders after being hired. In addition, the research showed ex-offenders were much less likely to quit a job than non-offenders.

    With a historically tight job market, you might need to get creative with your hiring policies. And as you explore your hiring options, keep in mind Equal Employment Opportunity guidelines and protections apply when hiring ex-offenders just as they would with any other job candidate.

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    Published at Mon, 24 Jul 2017 20:22:11 +0000

    ASTM International Launches New Online Learning Management System

    ASTM International Launches New Online Learning Management System

    ASTM International announced that it is launching a new learning management system (LMS) designed to enhance user experience and functionality. Existing customers will begin seeing a seamless transition to the new platform. The migration will be completed by Aug. 31.
     
    According to ASTM International, since 2012, the number of online users has grown from 500 to over 4,000. Usage increased by over 174 percent last year alone, prompting the need for a more robust platform.
     
    The new LMS features an expanded search tool, 24/7 access to ASTM International training content, enhanced reporting capabilities and customized curriculums. Training modules are accessible from any device.

    From the new homepage, learners will be able to find new training modules, access completed training, browse catalogs, and print certificates. In addition, courses can be downloaded and completed offline.

    Accirdng to the organization, there will be continued updates to the LMS, including the addition of a “video wall,” where learners will have easier access to training videos.

    For more information, visit the website or contact the learning management team via email at LMS_Support@astm.org

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    Published at Fri, 21 Jul 2017 18:41:40 +0000

    Roofinox Displays Stainless Steel Roofing Products at ATAS Product Expo

    Roofinox Displays Stainless Steel Roofing Products at ATAS Product Expo

    Roofinox America recently joined with ATAS International to educate more than 125 contractors, architects, engineers, distributors and building owners about the latest advances in building materials at the ATAS Product & Education Expo. Held at the ATAS headquarters in Allentown, Pa., the event included the display of Roofinox’s full line of stainless steel roofing products designed to offer long-term sustainability and corrosion resistance for virtually all forms of roofing applications. 

    “ATAS International was pleased to once again host our annual product expo,” stated Lee Ann M. Slattery, sales support manager for ATAS International.  “In addition to the vendor displays and plant tours, we also offered three AIA continuing education seminars throughout the day.  These seminars were highlighted by numerous topics related to metal roofing, rain screen systems, and sustainable building envelopes applications. It is our goal to increase awareness and knowledge throughout the AEC community for the proper and growing use of metal building components.”

    “We were happy to join ATAS in this educational forum,” said Dave Rowe, vice president at Roofinox America. “Architects and engineers are continually searching for the latest ways to enhance the longevity and sustainability of their design projects. Stainless steel is ideal for applications ranging from rural, urban and light industrial sites to locations based in extreme coastal environments.”

    The Roofinox product line consists of Roofinox Classic brush-rolled stainless steel, Roofinox Pearl bead-blasted stainless steel, Roofinox Plus ribbed stainless steel, Roofinox Chroma mirror-rolled stainless steel and Roofinox Tin-plated (Terne), the only tin-plated stainless steel product specifically developed and manufactured for roll forming and fabricating, according to the manufacturer. Designed to offer long-term sustainability and corrosion-resistance for wall-cladding, flashing, rainware, interior design and virtually all forms of roofing applications, each Roofinox product is also designed to be very easy to seam, while offering superior aesthetics and reducing machine and tool wear.

    ATAS International manufactures metal roofing, metal wall cladding, metal ceiling panels and metal accessories, produces systems for commercial and residential buildings. The ATAS metal roofing and metal wall product line offers more than 20 profiles available in stainless steel, aluminum, steel, zinc and copper.

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    Published at Fri, 21 Jul 2017 19:00:58 +0000